Apr
17

Yesterday I posted about upgrading my blog to BlogCFC 5.9.3. How I went about the upgrade process is probably just as important as getting on the latest version. What follows is a run-down of how I upgraded, what tools I used to make it painless, and the SQL scripts I wrote you can use to get your own blog upgraded. Hit the more link for all the goodness.

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May
24

I just finished reading an excellent article by David Bell on performance tuning Subversion in relation to binary file storage. Binary files are much large that ASCII/text files and thus require (and create) more overhead on the Subversion server. The article discussions various binary storage formats and compares and contrasts their differences. Other topics include how repository authentication and the hardware running a Subversion repository play a role in the performance of check-in and check-out operations.

If you manage a Subversion repository or server, or are just interested in the topic, I highly recommend this article.

View the article:
http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-svnbins.html?ca=dgr-lnxw01javapts

Mar
15

Throughout the parts of this text I've used TortoiseSVN to perform all repository actions. This was mainly due to the simplicity and ease of use TortoiseSVN affords. TortoiseSVN is also handy when versioning assets that aren't code-related like spreadsheets and general documents. When working with code - ColdFusion for instance - there are other Subversion clients that work just as good as TortoiseSVN and don't require you to leave your development environment to request repository updates or commit changes. One such tool is Subclipse which is built on the open-source Eclipse platform. Eclipse is an extremely popular Java-based programming tool that works with just about every modern programming language. I use Eclipse and Eclipse plugins like CFEclipse on a daily basis to manage my code. In the this section, I discuss installing, configuring, and using Subclipse, the Subversion plugin for Eclipse.

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Mar
14

At the end of Part 2 we briefly looked at Apache's logging of Subversion's "traffic." We'll revisit this topic in this section discovering a better way to configure logging. We'll also address repository security adding a couple DAV directives that create authenticated repository access. Let's get right to it.

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Mar
14

In Part 1 I walked through the installation of the Apache Web server. In Part 2 I covered the installation of Subversion and the integration of Subversion and Apache. This involved configuring an Apache Virtual Host to handle all the requests that come from the Subversion sub-domain (svn.yourcompany.com:81). We also configured dedicated logging for all Subversion HTTP requests through appropriate Virtual Hosts directives. Finally, we looked at browsing the Subversion repositories via a Web browser, but since we hadn't created any repositories, this task was pretty unexciting. In this section I'll discuss the installation of TortoiseSVN, a popular client-side Subversion tool. Through TortoiseSVN we'll be able to create our first repository and perform our first repository import.

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Mar
13

In Part 1 I walked through the installation of the Apache Web server. With that step complete it's time to install the Subversion server and integrate Subversion and Apache. Once we've completed these steps we'll have our source control server environment in place and we'll be ready to install some Subversion client tools.

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Mar
12

Part 1 of this text is going to walk you through installing and configuring the Apache Web server in preparation for hooking Apache and Subversion together.

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Mar
12

During the past two weeks I have worked on a new paper outlining the process of installing and configuring a development environment with Apache, Subversion, TortoiseSVN, and Subclipse. Over the next day or two I will be posting the individual parts of the paper as a blog series. For those that prefer to read offline, the entire text (60 pages and 91 screenshots) is available as a PDF download (see below). This blog post kicks off the 5 part series with the Introduction.

Click here to download Configuring a Development Environment with Apache, Subversion, TortoiseSVN, and Subclipse or click the "more" link to begin with the introduction.

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Jul
10

Anyone who has attended one of the Nashville CF User Group presentations knows how I'm a huge Breeze fan. Having the ability to reach beyond your local user group and city and involve remote users in exciting presentations is a lot of fun and very educational.

Next week, the Boston CF user group will be hosting a live Breeze presentation on Subversion and Trac with Peter Farrell delivering the talk. I haven't seen Peter present this talk, but I would certainly recommend folks check it out. I will be in San Jose next week - at Adobe headquarters - and will try and attend, but my schedule will likely prevent it.

If you're interested, here's the relevant info:

Peter Farrell's blog post regarding the preso:

When:
Wednesday, July 12, 2006 6:30pm EST

Where (RSVP for the URL):
http://coldfusion.meetup.com/17/events/5014773/

May
23

I've been spending a fair amount of time lately getting acquainted with the Subclipse Subversion plugin for Eclipse. Me and the rest of the folks in the user group are using a Subversion repository to manage the implementation of our new Web site.

Through using Subclipse over the last few days I've found myself constantly using the Subversion Console tab and the Pending SVN Operations tab. The Console tab shows all the command-line operations initiated each time you use one of the Subclipse menu options to update your local files or commit changes to your repository. Knowing what underlying commands are generated and the results therein is very useful in understanding how things work. The Pending SVN Operations tab is viewable by right clicking your CFEclipse project and selecting the Team->Show Pending Operations option. This view will present you with a list of local files that you have altered and that need to be committed to the repository. Simply right-clicking the files listed and selecting Team->Commit will let you submit your changes and comments to your repository.

I'm still trying to figure some things out, so if anyone has similar tips or tricks, please pass them on!

Mar
24

The tutorials section of my Web site is getting rather dated so I'd like to freshen it up a bit. Fortunately, a few people have requested certain tutorials/articles, like a new ColdFusion Login tutorial that focuses on ColdFusion MX 7's Application.cfc component. I'm working on this one and hope to have it up on the site by the end of this weekend. I'm also writing a detailed series of blog posts focusing on getting Apache, ColdFusion, MySQL, Eclipse (and CFEclipse), and Subversion running on OS X. However, I'm curious as to what other tutorials the general community is interested in. So, shoot me an e-mail or post in the comments and let me know what you'd like to see.