Feb
7

This post is a followup to my previous guide to installing ColdFusion 9 on Ubuntu. While that post was all about the specifics to getting ColdFusion up and running on Ubuntu, this post is all about CentOS. The overall process is the same and I'm covering all the same steps, but the commands in this post are specific to the CentOS operating system. So why I'm writing this?

Overall, installing ColdFusion isn't that big of a deal. But I've yet to see a guide or blog post that outlines all the other topics related to getting a decent ColdFusion server on CentOS up and running. That's why I wrote this super guide, to outline what I believe is important to know about installing ColdFusion. Of course, I'm not covering every single possible detail, but I believe I've hit on all the major topics. Along the way I sprinkle in my own ideas, thoughts, and what I believe are best practices. After you read this post and walk through all the instructions you should have a very solid ColdFusion / Apache set up on CentOS Linux.

There are two important things to note, so please read on.

Everything you will read, all paths, and every setup aspect is written specifically for CentOS. I've tested these instructions on CentOS 5.5, but they should be applicable to other recent versions. If you need instructions for Ubuntu, please read that guide here.

Secondly, and this is extremely important, all commands throughout this post are assumed to be run as root. Some of the commands can be run without root, but most of them cannot. So please, log into your CentOS server using the root account, put sudo in front of every command, or run the su - root command (under a non-root account) before walking through the instructions.

Before we get going, here's a list of what I'll be covering:

  1. Creating a Linux user for ColdFusion
  2. Disabling SSH and FTP login for the coldfusion user account
  3. Installing the required libstdc++.so.5 C++ Library
  4. Running the ColdFusion installer
  5. Starting ColdFusion for the first time
  6. Installing the ColdFusion 9.0.1 updater
  7. Verifying the installation of 9.0.1
  8. Creating a new ColdFusion instance for general use
  9. Tweaking the JVM memory settings
  10. Hooking Apache and ColdFusion together
  11. Getting the Apache Connector running with selinux
  12. Locking down Apache
  13. Configuring ColdFusion to start on system boot

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Jan
24

As I was finishing this guide on installing ColdFusion 9 on Ubuntu Linux I tweeted how many words made up the text (over 6,000). Several people commented on Twitter and Facebook saying things like: "[the length] seems a bit excessive," and "is it that complicated?" The thing is, I'm covering much more than simply installing ColdFusion. Overall, just installing ColdFusion isn't that big of a deal. But I've yet to see a guide or blog post that outlines all the other topics related to getting a decent ColdFusion server on Ubuntu up and running. That's why I wrote this super guide, to outline what I believe is important to know about installing ColdFusion. Of course, I'm not covering every single possible detail, but I believe I've hit on all the major topics. Along the way I sprinkle in my own ideas, thoughts, and what I believe are best practices. After you read this post and walk through all the instructions you should have a very solid ColdFusion / Apache set up on Ubuntu Linux.

There are two important things to note, so please read on.

First, this post is all about Ubuntu. Everything you will read, all paths, and every setup aspect is written specifically for Ubuntu. I've tested these instructions on Ubuntu 10.04 (Lucid Lynx), but they should be accurate from 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope) on. If you're disappointed this was written for Ubuntu, don't be. I have a CentOS post right here that covers all the same topics.

Secondly, and this is extremely important, all commands throughout this post are assumed to be run as root. Some of the commands can be run without root, but most of them cannot. So please, log into your Ubuntu server using the root account, put sudo in front of every command, or run the su - root command (under a non-root account) before walking through the instructions.

Before we get going, here's a list of what I'll be covering:

  1. Creating a Linux user for ColdFusion
  2. Disabling SSH and FTP login for the coldfusion user account
  3. Installing the required libstdc++.so.5 C++ Library
  4. Running the ColdFusion installer
  5. Starting ColdFusion for the first time
  6. Installing the ColdFusion 9.0.1 updater
  7. Verifying the installation of 9.0.1
  8. Creating a new ColdFusion instance for general use
  9. Tweaking the JVM memory settings
  10. Hooking Apache and ColdFusion together
  11. Locking down Apache
  12. Configuring ColdFusion to start on system boot

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Oct
4

Web application security is a difficult topic and can't be covered completely in a single blog post. After the break I discuss one quick way to block ColdFusion Administrator requests in Apache. I also list other resources that will help you understand ColdFusion security and how to apply practical security constructs on your ColdFusion servers.

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Jul
6

I was super excited to learn the folks at Agile Web Solutions have released a beta version of 1Password for Android. As a new user to the Android platform and a long-time user of 1Password, I'm glad I won't have to convert my password database to something other than 1Password just for use on Android.

For the time being the only information on this beta release is in the Agile Web Solutions forum. There you'll find information on installing 1Password from the Android Marketplace and copying your password data from your computer to your Android device.

Jan
16

You've been able to turn on SSL on your Gmail account since 2008. It was a transmission preference that Google let you manage on your own. That management has supposedly been taken away as Google has announced HTTPS is now default on all Gmail accounts.

According to the blog posts, and the below screenshot from a Gmail help page, only those users who had not already changed their security setting will have it turned on by default. And even after they've turned it on by default you'll still be able to turn it off the same way you have before.

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