Feb
7

This post is a followup to my previous guide to installing ColdFusion 9 on Ubuntu. While that post was all about the specifics to getting ColdFusion up and running on Ubuntu, this post is all about CentOS. The overall process is the same and I'm covering all the same steps, but the commands in this post are specific to the CentOS operating system. So why I'm writing this?

Overall, installing ColdFusion isn't that big of a deal. But I've yet to see a guide or blog post that outlines all the other topics related to getting a decent ColdFusion server on CentOS up and running. That's why I wrote this super guide, to outline what I believe is important to know about installing ColdFusion. Of course, I'm not covering every single possible detail, but I believe I've hit on all the major topics. Along the way I sprinkle in my own ideas, thoughts, and what I believe are best practices. After you read this post and walk through all the instructions you should have a very solid ColdFusion / Apache set up on CentOS Linux.

There are two important things to note, so please read on.

Everything you will read, all paths, and every setup aspect is written specifically for CentOS. I've tested these instructions on CentOS 5.5, but they should be applicable to other recent versions. If you need instructions for Ubuntu, please read that guide here.

Secondly, and this is extremely important, all commands throughout this post are assumed to be run as root. Some of the commands can be run without root, but most of them cannot. So please, log into your CentOS server using the root account, put sudo in front of every command, or run the su - root command (under a non-root account) before walking through the instructions.

Before we get going, here's a list of what I'll be covering:

  1. Creating a Linux user for ColdFusion
  2. Disabling SSH and FTP login for the coldfusion user account
  3. Installing the required libstdc++.so.5 C++ Library
  4. Running the ColdFusion installer
  5. Starting ColdFusion for the first time
  6. Installing the ColdFusion 9.0.1 updater
  7. Verifying the installation of 9.0.1
  8. Creating a new ColdFusion instance for general use
  9. Tweaking the JVM memory settings
  10. Hooking Apache and ColdFusion together
  11. Getting the Apache Connector running with selinux
  12. Locking down Apache
  13. Configuring ColdFusion to start on system boot

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Jan
24

As I was finishing this guide on installing ColdFusion 9 on Ubuntu Linux I tweeted how many words made up the text (over 6,000). Several people commented on Twitter and Facebook saying things like: "[the length] seems a bit excessive," and "is it that complicated?" The thing is, I'm covering much more than simply installing ColdFusion. Overall, just installing ColdFusion isn't that big of a deal. But I've yet to see a guide or blog post that outlines all the other topics related to getting a decent ColdFusion server on Ubuntu up and running. That's why I wrote this super guide, to outline what I believe is important to know about installing ColdFusion. Of course, I'm not covering every single possible detail, but I believe I've hit on all the major topics. Along the way I sprinkle in my own ideas, thoughts, and what I believe are best practices. After you read this post and walk through all the instructions you should have a very solid ColdFusion / Apache set up on Ubuntu Linux.

There are two important things to note, so please read on.

First, this post is all about Ubuntu. Everything you will read, all paths, and every setup aspect is written specifically for Ubuntu. I've tested these instructions on Ubuntu 10.04 (Lucid Lynx), but they should be accurate from 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope) on. If you're disappointed this was written for Ubuntu, don't be. I have a CentOS post right here that covers all the same topics.

Secondly, and this is extremely important, all commands throughout this post are assumed to be run as root. Some of the commands can be run without root, but most of them cannot. So please, log into your Ubuntu server using the root account, put sudo in front of every command, or run the su - root command (under a non-root account) before walking through the instructions.

Before we get going, here's a list of what I'll be covering:

  1. Creating a Linux user for ColdFusion
  2. Disabling SSH and FTP login for the coldfusion user account
  3. Installing the required libstdc++.so.5 C++ Library
  4. Running the ColdFusion installer
  5. Starting ColdFusion for the first time
  6. Installing the ColdFusion 9.0.1 updater
  7. Verifying the installation of 9.0.1
  8. Creating a new ColdFusion instance for general use
  9. Tweaking the JVM memory settings
  10. Hooking Apache and ColdFusion together
  11. Locking down Apache
  12. Configuring ColdFusion to start on system boot

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Oct
4

Web application security is a difficult topic and can't be covered completely in a single blog post. After the break I discuss one quick way to block ColdFusion Administrator requests in Apache. I also list other resources that will help you understand ColdFusion security and how to apply practical security constructs on your ColdFusion servers.

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May
13

Way back in January I gave a sneak peek of an Apache article I had written for the Fusion Authority Quarterly. During the welcome reception of the Adobe Community Summit (last night) Terrance Ryan came up and said he had read (and enjoyed mind you) my article. Up until that moment I didn't even know it was released.

If you're interested in understanding Apache more I encourage you to check out my article. While you're at it, why not purchase a subscription to FAQU? It's an excellent magazine available in print and PDF versions.

Jan
16

Upchucking Prompts Good Chuckle

Posted by Aaron West at 10:05 PM in ColdFusion, Apache

Over the weekend I was finishing the first draft of my Apache Essentials for ColdFusion Developers article in the next issue of the Fusion Authority Quarterly Update. I use Apple's Pages to do most any kind of writing and while spell checking the article, Pages prompted me with the following:



While the spell checker couldn't have been more "off," I did get a chuckle out of the suggestion.

Jan
14

UPDATE
With the 8.0.1 update of ColdFusion, OS X 10.5 Leopard is natively supported. To install ColdFusion you simply download the 32-bit or 64-bit version of the OS X installer and walk through the installation screen. The steps I outlined below, getting a custom compiled version of the Apache 2.2.x connector are no longer necessary as CF8 ships with an appropriate connector.

----------------

I've had ColdFusion 8 running on OS X 10.5 (Leopard) and hooked to Apache 2.2.6 for a while now. However, two things have occurred that are prompting me to write this blog entry. First, I've gotten several questions on exactly how I got things working - even with the other blog entries that outline a similar process. Second, I ran into an odd issue Friday when configuring everything on my new work MacBook Pro.

This is a small part of an article I'm writing for the Fusion Authority Quarterly Update Volume 2 Issue 4, due out in February. The information is so important I felt it could not wait, and am publishing this with permission from Fusion Authority. In this blog post, I will discuss the installation issue and its resolution, and provide my consolidated, easy steps for getting ColdFusion 8 hooked to Apache 2.2.x on Leopard.

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Dec
3

Search Engine Safe URL's (often abbreviated SES) are attractive to Web developers and business owners because they "pretty up" the browser address bar, help search engines crawl through site content, and generally make it easier to share URL's to content deep within a Web site. The advantages to using SES URL's are covered exhaustively throughout the Web if you want more reasons why you should use them. For information on how to set up and configure Apache's mod_rewrite including the creation of SES URL's for a Mach-ii site, read on...

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Mar
15

Throughout the parts of this text I've used TortoiseSVN to perform all repository actions. This was mainly due to the simplicity and ease of use TortoiseSVN affords. TortoiseSVN is also handy when versioning assets that aren't code-related like spreadsheets and general documents. When working with code - ColdFusion for instance - there are other Subversion clients that work just as good as TortoiseSVN and don't require you to leave your development environment to request repository updates or commit changes. One such tool is Subclipse which is built on the open-source Eclipse platform. Eclipse is an extremely popular Java-based programming tool that works with just about every modern programming language. I use Eclipse and Eclipse plugins like CFEclipse on a daily basis to manage my code. In the this section, I discuss installing, configuring, and using Subclipse, the Subversion plugin for Eclipse.

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Mar
14

At the end of Part 2 we briefly looked at Apache's logging of Subversion's "traffic." We'll revisit this topic in this section discovering a better way to configure logging. We'll also address repository security adding a couple DAV directives that create authenticated repository access. Let's get right to it.

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Mar
14

In Part 1 I walked through the installation of the Apache Web server. In Part 2 I covered the installation of Subversion and the integration of Subversion and Apache. This involved configuring an Apache Virtual Host to handle all the requests that come from the Subversion sub-domain (svn.yourcompany.com:81). We also configured dedicated logging for all Subversion HTTP requests through appropriate Virtual Hosts directives. Finally, we looked at browsing the Subversion repositories via a Web browser, but since we hadn't created any repositories, this task was pretty unexciting. In this section I'll discuss the installation of TortoiseSVN, a popular client-side Subversion tool. Through TortoiseSVN we'll be able to create our first repository and perform our first repository import.

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Mar
13

In Part 1 I walked through the installation of the Apache Web server. With that step complete it's time to install the Subversion server and integrate Subversion and Apache. Once we've completed these steps we'll have our source control server environment in place and we'll be ready to install some Subversion client tools.

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Mar
12

Part 1 of this text is going to walk you through installing and configuring the Apache Web server in preparation for hooking Apache and Subversion together.

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Mar
12

During the past two weeks I have worked on a new paper outlining the process of installing and configuring a development environment with Apache, Subversion, TortoiseSVN, and Subclipse. Over the next day or two I will be posting the individual parts of the paper as a blog series. For those that prefer to read offline, the entire text (60 pages and 91 screenshots) is available as a PDF download (see below). This blog post kicks off the 5 part series with the Introduction.

Click here to download Configuring a Development Environment with Apache, Subversion, TortoiseSVN, and Subclipse or click the "more" link to begin with the introduction.

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Mar
24

The tutorials section of my Web site is getting rather dated so I'd like to freshen it up a bit. Fortunately, a few people have requested certain tutorials/articles, like a new ColdFusion Login tutorial that focuses on ColdFusion MX 7's Application.cfc component. I'm working on this one and hope to have it up on the site by the end of this weekend. I'm also writing a detailed series of blog posts focusing on getting Apache, ColdFusion, MySQL, Eclipse (and CFEclipse), and Subversion running on OS X. However, I'm curious as to what other tutorials the general community is interested in. So, shoot me an e-mail or post in the comments and let me know what you'd like to see.

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